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opportunities for media/journalism students or amateur jornos

By on Apr 26, 2006 in activism, citizen journalism, conferences/events, wemedia | 5 comments

Are you a media or journalism student? Reckon you can podcast, shoot and edit video for the web, blog, write articles for student magazines or newspapers? If so, the We Media Fringe, taking place at a secret location in SoHo, London on 03 May 2006 needs you! You’ll get an exclusive "fringe press pass" to attend and cover the event. You’ll get to meet some of the media world’s bigger (we won’t say biggest) names, interesting new media types, internet activists and a few people with strange coloured hair. YOU will get preferential access over any proper press card carrying, TV camera toting, radio boom prodding professional journalists who turn up. It is a fringe afterall. Get in touch if you think you fit the bill, are really going to turn up on the evening, don’t expect payment or free beer, and generally just think this might be a cool way to create some content to share online (or elsewhere). Reply with a comment (link just beneath this text) containing your email address and, if you’ve got a blog or whatever, a link. **UPDATE: BBC 5Live’s Pods and Blogs has agreed that, in exchange of us letting their journalist in, they’ll work alonside our "official fringe podcaster" and use their audio on-air. We’ve cut a similar deal with the BBC News Website, giving a journalism or media student the opportunity to work alongside the BBC’s Alf Hermida at the fringe event. ** If you are a bonafide student, a podcaster, an amateur video producer etc and want to cover the event please meet at the venue at 6pm. I’ve already got a list of some of you but a few more are...

wemedia fringe – confirmation of event

By on Apr 25, 2006 in activism, citizen journalism, conferences/events, wemedia | 6 comments

It’s unofficially official! Due to the efforts of a small band of co-conspirators, the WeMedia fringe event is going to take place in London on the evening of Wednesday 03 May 2006. So far we’ve organised the following speakers for the fringe event and are hoping to confirm several more: Suw Charman, Executive Director, Open Rights Group Neil Dixon, creator of BritCaster.com Paul Evans who blogs at nevertrustahippy.blogspot.com Michael Tippett,founder of nowpublic.com Neha Viswanathan (withinandwithout.com and globalvoicesonline.org) Tim Ireland, online marketing expert and activist who blogs at bloggerheads.com Dr Chris Yapp, Head of Public Sector Innovation, Microsoft Ben Metcalfe (benmetcalfe.com / backstage.bbc.co.uk) A political blogger who goes by the name of "Guido Fawkes" (order-order.com) The conference organisers caught wind of the post I made last month suggesting a fringe and are working towards delivering some interesting speakers from conference itself. I don’t have the names yet but will post them when I do. The event will be guest list only BUT we’re going to go to great pains to ensure that a wide selection of people from all walks of life are able to attend. And the event will be covered by some journalism and media students (see my next post if you’re someone who fits the bill!) so everyone will at least be able to see what happened on the night. So what to do now if you want your name on the guest list? Come back here soon… About We Media – the Conference: The We Media Global Forum brings together the trailblazers of the connected society – the thinkers, innovators, investors, executives and activists seeking to tap the potential of digital networks connecting people everywhere. (official...

lot’s of bad stuff, you know, happens on…

By on Apr 24, 2006 in law | 1 comment

Lot’s of bad stuff, you know, happens on sites like… yeah, that one. Now, reports the Chronicle, students disciplined by their schools for posts they’ve made online, often from computers far removed from their school’s network, are fighting back with help from the ACLU. Speaking of myspace, I just came across (thanks youthnet) mydeathspace.com which isn’t some dark goth site or bad taste parody encouraging teenagers to commit suicide or anything like that, it’s actually quite touching. If you can figure out how to close the ad the covers the entire page when you get there that is. From (the page past the ad) mydeathspace.com: Only three things are certain in life. MySpace, Taxes, and Death. If you have a MySpace account and you die, this is where you will end up. MyDeathSpace.com memorializes deceased MySpace users and picks up where a regular obituary leaves off. Click the MySpace Deaths link at the top to view the latest MySpace...

wemedia fringe – 03 May (TBC)

By on Apr 22, 2006 in conferences/events, wemedia | 2 comments

A few weeks ago I posted here asking if anyone would be interested in attending or helping to organise a wemedia fringe event in London. The idea is to create a fringe event to the WeMedia conference but make it free or very low cost to ensure it’s open and accessible to a diverse range of participants, particularly those unable to attend to actual conference. After dozens of emails and phone calls, and with the help of a few supporters in the wings, I’ve managed to find and tentatively reserve a central London venue for the evening of 03 May. Several people are now working on securing interesting speakers from wemedia to come speak at the fringe event. It’s still a bit premature for me to reveal the details but watch this space – on Tuesday the 25th I’m hoping to have the details all firmed up and a way for people to register their interest in attending. Don’t book a train or plane ticket. Don’t email me in an attempt to pry out more information. But do jot down the date on your hand and stop washing… WeMedia Conference Website The post where I originally pitched the idea of having a "wemedia fringe" event (Please Note: "wemedia fringe" is not endorsed by or in any way connected to the wemedia conference, The Media Center, or BBC and Reuters who are co-sponsoring this years’...

europeans still surfing, not creating online content

By on Apr 19, 2006 in academic studies |

A new study by Jupiter Research, as reported in yesterday’s Guardian, suggests that "bloggers and internet pundits are exerting a "disproportionately large influence" on society…" Ok, we already knew that, but the research is actually quite interesting because it suggests that alongside the huge growth in social networking and other community building websites in recent years and months, 3/4 of Europeans don’t actually create any online content. The study suggests that: More than half of the internet users on the continent are passive and do not contribute to the web at all a further 23% only respond when prompted although "active" web users make up only a small proportion of Europe’s online population, they are increasingly dominating public conversations and creating business trends unprompted contributors are generally younger and more vocal than the wider online population and are increasingly important as opinion formers and trend-setters. Jupiter’s Julian Smith told The Guardian that "The strongest part of their influence is on the media: if something online suddenly becomes a story in the local press, then it...