Twitter

back soon…

By on Sep 27, 2006 in Uncategorized |

I’m taking a short break and, after some deliberation and quite a few comments from you, I’ve decided to let the blog have a break too. Looking for some good stuff? I’m subscribed to about 60 feeds that you might find interesting and have hundreds of sites bookmarked on my del.icio.us. You might also want to try some of my more popular categories (full list to the right), including citizen journalism, internet libel and online community. If you fancy your hand at stalking my blog posts (you didn’t expect me to suggest you stalk me, did you?!), you can have a look at what other blogs are saying about cybersoc.com. It will be back to normal service – hopefully awash with inspiration and fresh energy – on what is, incidently, the 10th anniversary of the very first one page version of cybersoc! I’ve put comments into pre-moderation so new comments won’t appear straight away. Sorry about...

teaching an old post new tricks: netvocates again

By on Sep 26, 2006 in Uncategorized | 8 comments

I always find it strange how a post that’s several months old can suddenly get a link from a big site and go bonkers with traffic. Remember a few months back when I started posting about Netvocates, the company that willfully uses B.I.A.S. [“Blog Intelligence and Advocacy Service” – I kid you not] as it’s acronym. (I’ll link to all the posts I’ve tagged with Netvocates but, as they’re in the business of Astrotufing, I’m not going to link directly to them from this post.) When I first blogged it, the post got some links from some busy blogs (Daily Kos, Pandagon and others), which were then linked to by lots of smaller sites, and then reblogged by lots of people on livejournal and by forum users. A couple months later, the whole thing was revived with a link from Feministe and traffic spiked up again. Today it’s round three with a link from Crooks and Liars sending upwards of a thousand visitors to that post about Netvocates from way back in...

some links for tuesday

By on Sep 26, 2006 in Uncategorized |

paperless German “newspaper” launches “citizen journalism” site: Readers-Edition.de Danah Boyd’s social networking researchers and research roundup Pew: Future of the Internet II (study) can you get traffic from social bookmarking / recommendations? caught astroturfing ways of measuring blog popularity (from Roland) social media ecologies (things people do with social media) teacher to sue myspace over fake profile (US case) Flickr-based smartmobbing: The Ministry of Reshelving Citizen Media Summit Dow Jones senior editor fellowships awards for "digital edgieness" for online newspapers (pdf) Johns Hopkins international news fellowships Nevada Newspaper bans staff blogs Washington Post political ads database Knight Media Center fellowships for top portal editors knight foundation has $5 million for community news projects… As usual, you can view the rest of my bookmarks on...

my bbc radio interview with howard rheingold

By on Sep 26, 2006 in academic studies, BBC, citizen journalism, mobile, online community, social software, wemedia | 1 comment

My interview with Howard Rheingold appeared on BBC Radio 5 Live’s Pods and Blogs last night. You can listen to it online. The programme is here and the interview, which lasts about 10 minutes, starts at 26:30. (While listening, do check out the Pods and Blogs blog that’s part of the BBC Blogs Trial I’m currently project managing.) We talked about the common themes between his books, the differences between mobile phone and social software usage in the UK compared to the US, and participatory media. Howard appears in photo with Ian Forrester who you’ll find more of at CubicGarden. I’ve posted additional photos in my flickr...

some law related news

By on Sep 25, 2006 in academic studies, internet libel, law | 2 comments

Regular readers will know that, for the past two years, I’ve been working on a part-time post-graduate law degree in law at the University of Hertfordshire. Word arrived today that I’ve now successfully completed the Common Practical Exam which is effectively the post-graduate equivalent of an undergraduate degree in law. But that’s not the end of my good, law related news. I’ve also recently been invited to be a non-residential fellow at Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society. I’ll post more about the fellowship and my specific project, which is a participatory research project looking at citizen journalism, when I’ve got the details together. I’ll be celebrating with a few spoonfuls of cough syrup since I’m currently a bit under the...