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conde nast buys reddit – but why?

By on Oct 31, 2006 in online community, social software | 2 comments

Wired Digital, part of the Conde Nast group, has purchased the social bookmarking site Reddit for an undisclosed amount. Like Digg, Reddit is essentially a social recommendation tool for online news stories. Registered users add a story and other users then give it an up or down vote, moving it towards the top or bottom of the day’s stories. Also like Digg, the top of the list is usually dominated by technology stories but, increasingly, politics, big international news stories, and the occasional “wierd world” piece gets in there too. (Have a look at popurls, a site that aggregates lots of different bookmarking, recommendation and social media sites if you want to compare the results of these services yourself.) I guess the increasing number of non-tech stories, or more correctly decreasing dominance of them, means these sites are – thankfully – becoming more and more mainstream. It will be interesting to see this acquisition affects the talks that, reportedly, were recently underway between Digg and a number of possible suitors, including News Corp. Personally, I think that deal was a better fit than Conde Nast’s pairing with Reddit. It’s obvious that News Corp could make use of Digg’s recommendation engine, particularly as it helps capture the zeitgeist of the moment in a way that News Corp could instantly make useful in their audience research, news broadcasts and newspaper titles. Most Conde Nast titles, on the other hand, just don’t deal with the type of content that would find it’s way into Reddit, at least not at with Reddit’s existing userbase and implimentation. Ok, so Wired might make good use of it, but how many readers of Details, House and Garden, or Bride are really going to want to recommend an article and/or vote it up or down the list of stories? It’s not the type of content that gets the blood stirring. And that’s the thing I think a lot of people miss in the world of social media – people aren’t going to heed a call to action unless that call for action takes advantage of excitement, fear, love, hatred, joy or some other “get up and shout about it” emotion. Let’s not forget, Reddit’s not the first of the social bookmarking / social recommendation sites to get bought up – yahoo purchased del.icio.us back in December 2005 and, other than adding del.icio.us links to pages on yahoo stablemate flickr they haven’t quite figured out what to do with the service. Everyone, it seems, needs to own a piece of Web 2.0… bookmark this post: del.icio.us l Digg l Furl l ma.gnolia l Newsvine l reddit l Yahoo MyWeb l Track with...

links for 2006-10-31

By on Oct 31, 2006 in Uncategorized |

OJR: Meet the new face of hyperlocal journalism A former NYT columnist explains how a local blog can challenge, and scoop, a local paper while making a business of small-town coverage. (tags: local Journalism citizenjournalism web2.0 newspaperbusiness news2.0 blogs blogging networkjournalism networkedjournalism newspaperblogs newspaperwebsites annenberg) YouTube: videos are signs, watching is social The social participation YouTube gets in the video posting, commenting, rating, and circulating is what made it the killer app of hosted video. (tags: youtube socialsoftware video commenting rating participation mcluhan) 2000 journalists have been killed since World War II The memorial in Bayeux to slain journalists, said to be the first of its kind in Europe, features four white markers etched with the names of journalists, photographers, and camera and sound technicians killed since 1944 — when Allied troops liberated t (tags: journalism journalists warreporting hostileenvironments) Pay Per Troll Advertising (tags: netvocates trolls...

initial explorations of second life

By on Oct 30, 2006 in online community, social software | 3 comments

It seems everyone is jumping on the Second Life bandwagon. In the past few weeks, Wired and C-Net set up offices there, joining the BBC, who rented an Island to host a concert, and Reuters, who recently set up an in world news agency dedicated to covering events there. There was already a newspaper, Harvard law lectures, a Congressional investigation and a lawsuit about property rights. Even Presidential hopefuls, if you can call would be candidates that two years before the next US presidential race, are giving interviews on Second Life and posting the resulting video footage on YouTube. With all the hype it’s getting at the moment, it’s no surprise that Second Life has gone from around 850,000 registered users to 1.192 million in a couple of weeks. I was one of them… So what did I see? Well, my first experiences seem to follow those of many other observers: it’s very much like the offline world accept you access it via a computer which, for many of us, is how we access the offline world much of the time anyway. Within a few minutes of joining I’d managed to give my Avatar, Robinek Hunchke, some clothing and changed aspects of his facial appearance to more closely match my own. After a couple more minutes, people started to walk, or fly, up to me and say hello. I suppose that’s why new users of Second Life are deposited on Orientation Island – an Island full of newbies is bound to be a friendly place. I chatted with a guy who is a first year computer science student, and wants to see if he can hone his programming skills in Second Life. I also struck up a brief conversation with a recent graduate from Warsaw who, within a minute or two of our meeting, asked me if I knew where she might find work in Second Life. I couldn’t help but chuckle – Polish immigration to the UK being such a big news story at the moment. Parting ways with the other newbies, I flew off towards some buildings in the distance and – entirely by chance – found myself the lone punter in a virtual strip club on a Friday evening. Would I go back – not to the strip club, I mean to Second Life itself? Perhaps if I was bored, or suddenly found myself with more (some!) free time on my hands, then yes, I suppose it could be quite a compelling way to spend time. And I’d probably go back if I could figure out how to find the lectures and workshops being run by Harvard, Stanford and Howard Rheingold in Second Life. But I don’t have the time to become a regular participant, building and creating not just a virtual environment, but a new identity and life for myself. Online communities come in lots of different flavours. Second Life requires a significant investment of time, effort, and potentially of finances too. It also requires some pretty sophisticated infrastructure and hefty amounts of bandwidth at Linden Labs end. Because of time constraints, I’d rather blog, bookmark and share, and ocassionally comment. Whilst these activities of seeking out content, saving it, sharing it, then wrapping some editorial around it is valuable to me and, I hope, my readers. But it’s certainly not as labour intensive or all consuming in the same way as active participation in Second Life would be. I know I shouldn’t judge a book entirely by it’s cover, or a whole online world upon a single hour long visit, but I can definitely see how Second Life could be compelling to people who have the time and skills to make the most of...

links for 2006-10-30

By on Oct 30, 2006 in Uncategorized |

BBC web 2.0 plans (??) (apparently) The BBC will not be expanding its existing blogs aggressively according to Clifton but he said he hopes to launch a new blog to be written by BBC foreign correspondents around the world. (tags: bbcnews bbcblogs) Daily Show asks for clips to be removed from youtube Shame that… I would have never heard of it before I saw their videos on youtube. And what am I going to show at blog school now?! (tags: youtube law internetlaw copyright bloggingtechniques) American Journalism Review goes behind the scenes at newspaper website operations As newsrooms turn into diversified information retailers, the biggest distinction may be between those who develop the content and those who distribute it, via print, broadcast, the Internet or other channels. (tags: Journalism journalisttraining newspaperbusiness newspaperwebsites news2.0) Putting blogs to work for Wall Street (corporate blog watching) How do you make money off all that info bloggers provide? One start-up plans to parse the data for profits. (tags: blogging blogs astroturfing...

links for 2006-10-28

By on Oct 28, 2006 in Uncategorized |

Why I shut down my blog The story of a writer who shut down her blog because it was getting in the way of her doing anything productive (tags: blog blogging bloggingtechniques blogs) What property rights do you have in “virtual worlds” (eg Second Life, Wow?) Many of these virtual worlds host robust marketplaces that are a major draw for users. Yet, almost none of them confer any rights over virtual property… (tags: law internetlaw ownership secondlife property onlinecommunity onlinecommunitymanagement intellectualproperty) Lawsuit against Linden Labs re: Property Rights of users (appeal) [pdf] Mark Bragg is claiming damages against Linden Labs, owner of Second Life, for taking away has in game property which he says is valuable and just as much his as physical property (tags: secondlife onlinecommunity onlinecommunitymanagement law internetlaw) Martin Stabe investigates the Newspaper Blog Bandwagon… Andrew Grant-Adamson is rightly puzzled by the proliferation of blogs on newspapers’ web sites. Apparently bored during yesterday’s grey weather, he counted 40 blogs at Times, 32 at the Telegraph, 12 at Guardian, 10 at the Sun, five at the Mail. The M (tags: pressgazette newspapers newspaperblogs newspaperbusiness newspaperwebsites blogs blogging journalism) What is the purpose of newspaper blogs? One can almost hear some editors shouting: “We need more of these blog things. Everyone has them my daughter tells me.” They have become one of the outward signs that the paper is up with the trends in journalism. (tags: newspaperbusiness newspaperwebsites newspaperblogs news2.0 blogs blogging Journalism) Danish paper successfully defends itself from libel suit re: Prophet Mohammed Cartoons A court ruled on Thursday that Danish newspaper Jyllandsposten did not libel Muslims by printing cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed t (tags: internetlibel internetlaw newspapers newspaperbusiness Islam) BBC News Online’s Pete Clifton at the World Digital Publishing Conferenc He’s says they’ll build stuff, but this is the exciting bit: He also said plans existed to launch aggregation pages to complement BBC material with appropriate links to alterative news sites, blogs, and the websites of community and official bodies. (tags: bbc bbcblogs news news2.0 peteclifton journalism) UK AOP: The social web Kevin blogs it (tags: blogs yahoo cnet guardian socialmedia socialsoftware newsbusiness news2.0) Hundreds of lives could be saved if we didn’t roll back clocks… It’s all because of those pesky Scottish farmers. (tags: time research...