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links for 2007-01-31

By on Jan 31, 2007 in Uncategorized |

Top Ten Flickr Hacks (via Eyebeam Reblog) “so many of the ways that I use Flickr are not even through the site as designed by Yahoo, but instead through the work of outside developers who are constantly creating new and interesting ways to experience the site.” (tags: flickr socialsoftware aggregation blogging bloggingtechniques photos photosharing) Google Takes Action on Google Bombs by Changing Algorythms Google has defused the “Google Bomb” that has returned US President George W. Bush at the top of its results in a search on miserable failure… (tags: google googlebombs activism bush politics) ScoopLive Turns Us All Into Paparazzi “…one of a handful of entrants into the on-line marketplace for monetizing scoops, whose competitors already include Scoopt.com and SpyMedia.com.” (tags: citizenjournalism citizenpaps citizensnappers middlemen scoopt ugc usergeneratedcontent photos) The page impression is dad as a way of measuring social media… Trying to figure out how to measure social media use in an inciteful way has led some to start thinking about “engagement” as a measure. Great post rounding up lots of thoughts on this. (tags: engagement statistics SocialSoftware onlinecommunitymanagement bloggingtechniques) Trinity Mirror launches ultra-local citizen journalism sites They’re planning to launch up to 23 sites, based on user generated content that there isn’t room for in the print editions (tags: citizenjournalism citizenmedia web2.0 trinitymirror newspapers newspaperbusiness news2.0) Blogger Forced out of Town after branding it a shithole A chocolate store manager wasn’t too impressed with his new town, Barrow in Furness, and blogged that it was a shithole… he was soon run out of town after people saw it on his myspace account (tags: blogs blogging myspace...

1st argument of 2007: uk newspaper site stats

By on Jan 31, 2007 in journalism |

Last year we had the bloggers vs mainstream media, Jarvis vs Dell #2 (which seems to have ended amicably: see this note from Davos), what’s the purpose of newspaper blogs, and the fall out from Le Web 3. So far this year – ok, I realise we’re only a month into 2007 – things have been surprisingly nicey nicey in the blogosphere. Well, except for bloggerheads vs Guido which most people will have probably missed anyway. It looks like we’ve finally got our first big UK blogosphere fight of the year and it’s about stats. Rather boring, you might think, but The Guardian’s Simon Waldman has made an insightful post challenging the Telegraph’s claim to the title of UK’s busiest quality newspaper website. Waldman’s post is well worth a read since it not only contains a plethora of statistics for newspaper websites, but because it also discusses the shortfalls of relying on each, or indeed all, as an appropriate measurement. Which reminds me… I need to go back and re-read the interesting post about measuring engagement that I bookmarked the other...

links for 2007-01-28

By on Jan 28, 2007 in Uncategorized |

The BBC’s Tim Weber blogs the Web 2.0 session at Davos YouTube’s Chad Hurley; Microsoft founder Bill Gates; Caterina Fake, founder of Flickr; Nike chief executive Mark Parker; and EU commissioner Viviane Reding chat web 2.0 at Davos (tags: davos bbcblogs bbcnews web2.0 flickr youtube SocialSoftware) Youtube to start sharing revenue with people uploading videos (tags: video youtube SocialSoftware web2.0 bbcnews...

links for 2007-01-27

By on Jan 27, 2007 in Uncategorized |

Finding Those Local Blogs American centric but still a useful post on finding locally based blogs (tags: blog blogs citizenjournalism community hyperlocal newassignment local bloggingtechniques) A mine of student articles about online community, web 2.0, citizen journalism, etc From the Cardiff School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies – some good stuff here (tags: academic journalisttraining journalism web2.0 usergeneratedcontent citizenjournalism...

tom’s list: a lot of bbc 2.0 is about sharing

By on Jan 26, 2007 in BBC, blogging techniques, journalism, online community, social software | 2 comments

Tom Loosemoore, who is heading up the BBC 2.0 project, a project to rethink, modernise and – hopefully – futureproof the BBC’s online offerings, has posted a list of the BBC’s 15 Web Principles. I was involved in (a minute amount) of the early BBC 2.0 work and have seen lots of different internal presentations about what they’ve been doing since, but this is the first time I’ve seen Tom’s list and I’m happy to discover lots of stuff about sharing, linking, the BBC actually stepping out to other places online, etc. In particular, readers of cybersoc – who I assume hold these ideals closer to their hearts then most – will be interested in the following items on the list: 3. Do not attempt to do everything yourselves: link to other high-quality sites instead. Your users will thank you. Use other people’s content and tools to enhance your site, and vice versa. 5. Treat the entire web as a creative canvas: don’t restrict your creativity to your own site. 6. The web is a conversation. Join in: Adopt a relaxed, conversational tone. Admit your mistakes. 8. Make sure all your content can be linked to, forever. 10. Maximise routes to content: Develop as many aggregations of content about people, places, topics, channels, networks & time as possible. Optimise your site to rank high in Google. 13. Let people paste your content on the walls of their virtual homes: Encourage users to take nuggets of content away with them, with links back to your site 14. Link to discussions on the web, don’t host them: Only host web-based discussions where there is a clear...