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links for 2007-02-28

By on Feb 28, 2007 in Uncategorized |

Manchester Evening News talks about BBC Manchester Blog and My Blogs The article talks about our first blogging workshop, which was held at BBC Manchester last Thursday, as well as my various blogs. (tags: bbc bbcblogs bbcblog bbcmanchesterblog bbcmanchester manchester newspaper cybersoc) Academic Study Shows that Most News Really Does Come from 2 Sources Leeds University study, “News Agency Dominance in International News on the Internet” by Chris Paterson demonstrates that although there are multitude of online news sites, nearly all rely on two sources – Reuters and AP. (tags: associatedpress reuters news2.0 newsbusiness newspaperwebsites journalism academicresearch) Why Journalists Should Blog – from Northern Colorado Tribune Discusses, from a newspaper editor’s perspective, who should blog from one’s staff, when, and what the legal implications might be. (spotted on SacredFacts) (tags: blogging blogs Journalism newspapers newspaperblogs news2.0 newspaperwebsites colorado bloggingtechniques) Jarvis: Cover what you do best, link to the rest Jarvis argues that there is no point in news orgs replicating each other’s content. Dwindling resources demand that they make best of use of them and, in some instances, that means linking rather than doing your own version. (tags: bloggingtechniques linking jeffjarvis news2.0 newspaperwebsites newspaperbusiness sharing...

5 reasons that there is value in providing the link

By on Feb 28, 2007 in journalism | 2 comments

I just spotted a good post over on Buzzmachine where Jarvis pretty much backs up what I’ve been saying here for a long time: If you don’t have the content people are looking for, and someone else does, don’t bother making a second rate attempt to replicate it when you can simply link. Jarvis writes: Try this on as a new rule for newspapers: Cover what you do best. Link to the rest. That’s not how newspapers work now. They try to cover everything because they used to have to be all things to all people in their markets. So they had their own reporters replicate the work of other reporters elsewhere so they could say that they did it under their own bylines as a matter of pride and propriety. It’s the way things were done. They also took wire-service copy and reedited it so they could give their audiences the world. But in the age of the link, this is clearly inefficient and unnecessary. You can link to the stories that someone else did and to the rest of the world. And if you do that, it allows you to reallocate your dwindling resources to what matters, which in most cases should be local coverage. This changes the dynamic of editorial decisions. Instead of saying, “we should have that” (and replicating what is already out there) you say, “what do we do best?” That is, “what is our unique value?” It means that when you sit down to see a story that others have worked on, you should ask, “can we do it better?” If not, then link. And devote your time to what you can do better… That is where the architecture of news must go because links enable it and economics demand it. I think Jarvis has hit the nail on the head with this one. It’s utter nonsense and counter-productive for news organiations not to link out. Here’s my rationale: 1. News organisations have limited resources, as evidenced by this study that shows that the majority of them get most of their stories from AP and Reuters. 2. If a news outlet doesn’t have the resources to cover something properly, and differently than the next news outlet, then it would be better off simply linking rather than replicating poorly. 3. News consumers don’t want every newspaper, broadcaster and website out there to cover the same exact stories in very similar ways. Sure, we do want to find information about those stories, but the reason we visit a particular website is because there is something unique in the topics it covers or how it covers them. 4. If you can’t provide us with that dose of uniqueness, then providing us with carbon copy coverage of your own does nothing to keep our eyeballs – it merely dilutes the product we’ve come for. Provide the link, however, and the next time I’m looking for information on a story that it’s unlikely you’ll cover, I’ll still visit you first because I know you’ll point me towards someone else’s coverage that is something along the lines of what you would have done if you had been there. 5. And no, I’m not suggesting that news websites try to be google – I want contextualised, hand chosen links that fit the tone and outlook of the website I’m visiting, not something some website spider has turned up. There is, as ever, value in being the one who provides the...

3 types of blog: closed, conduit and participant in the conversation

By on Feb 26, 2007 in blogging, blogging techniques, social software | 11 comments

Tomorrow I’ll be giving a presentation about blogging to a group of radio producers and executives. I reckon some of them might still be of the persuasion that blogs are simply “web based diaries” and want to do something that shows that, yes, many are, but there are other types of blogs too. I’ve had a go at producing three different models or types of blogs that, I think, might be useful if one wanted to try to categorise all the blogs out there. Not that I’m sure doing that would actually be useful! But for the purpose of giving an idea of the different types of blogs out there, each of them perfectly valid in their own way, I propose the following, which you can view as a slide show here: Closed Blogs are, as the image here shows, at the centre of an audience that resembles a closed network. Blogs of this type include baby blogs and wedding planning blogs. Characteristically they have a: * small but extremely passionate and engaged audience * audience unlikely to grow * audience potentially super-served – they all have a very strong personal connection, usually running both ways. See, for example, the Aitken’s wedding blog Blogs as Conduit of Information are blogs that act as the conduit between individual audience members and information or ideas. That is, the blog is the centre of the relationship between the information consumers and information producers. The blog itself may not be the origin of this content, but may merely pull it together in a useful way. This sort of blog is characterised by: * potentially larger audience than closed blog model * audience highly engaged with personality and/or topic * audience unlikely to grow rapidly because it serves same audience without reaching out See, for example, the H5N1 blog or SCOTUS blog. Blog as Participant in “The Conversation” are connectors of ideas and people, but also of conversations that flow between them. Blogs of this sort have an audience potentially as big as the numbers actively engaged in the conversation. New people who get involved in the conversation, or who discover a node of it, may very well follow contextualised links, visit other sites in the chain, and become regular audience members of those sites. Bloggers who create blogs like this tend to engage with the comments on their blogs and link out heavily, using tools like RSS readers and technorati to follow the "buzz". Some also use social bookmarking or social recommendation tools to save, order and share links. This is highly evolved blogging as both use of technology and technique which, I think, an ideal that bloggers should strive for. Did I get the types right? Am I missing any that you can think of? I’m looking forward to some comments on this one as my thoughts are really at the preliminary stages here… [Update 07 March: This is, apparently, what I said in this post translated into...

links for 2007-02-26

By on Feb 26, 2007 in Uncategorized |

Pro Golfer sues business with IP range to trace author of potentially defamatory wikipedia entry Pro golfer Fuzzy Zoeller is suing to track down the author who posted what he considers a defamatory paragraph about him on the Internet reference site Wikipedia. He used the IP address on the entry to get as far as a Florida based business. (tags: anonymity wikipedia internetlibel libel internetlaw...

links for 2007-02-23

By on Feb 23, 2007 in Uncategorized |

Libel Tourism? Cameron Diaz successfully sues US website for libel in UK court The UK has some of the toughest libel laws – some would say skewed to far towards claimants – and now foreign parties are bringing their libel cases to our courts (tags: libel internetlaw internetlibel camerondiaz) BBC NEWS | Programmes | Newsnight | Blair’s Britain (by Jeremy Paxman) “Producer Richard has succumbed to the malaise afflicting much of the senior management of the BBC that things only have an existence if they have a web presence, a 360 degree profile and on-demand downloadability with a side-order of fries.” (tags: jeremypaxman bbc bbcnews sceptic) Slugger O’Toole gets a mention in the House (tags: politics politicalblogging government) Cartoon: If a tree falls and nobody blogs it, does it matter? (Via Sacred Facts) (tags: cartoon blogs blogging blogschool...