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presentation: blogging for apples

By on Sep 29, 2008 in blogging, blogging techniques, conferences/events, headshift, journalism, social software | 2 comments

Last week, Headshift co-hosted a blogging seminar with Six Apart, the makers of the Movable Type blogging platform. I wanted to talk about different types of blogs as a way of explaining why corporate and media blogs need to move away from one way publishing in favour of joining and participating in conversations. As I was preparing my presentation, I got thinking about the apple tree at the bottom of the garden. The first year I lived there the apple tree produced bunches of lovely apples. The impact of that tree didn’t, at least on the face of things, go much beyond the garden fence. This is like a personal blog, or web diary – the audience is small, intimately known, and very attentive. The purpose of such a blog is to superserve that audience, not to reach out to a new audience. The second year there were only a handful of blossoms in the spring and, despite several attempts to fertilise and water the tree back into fruit bearing, only 3 or 4 apples made it through the summer. This was because, although our apple tree remained the focus of our attention, the neighbour had cut down her trees and, with them, the blossoms that bees used to cross polinate my tree in previous years had disappeared. This is like the expert blog, where the author finds content – a photo, article, youtube video, etc – and shows it to their audience. The focus is still on publishing, upon having a one way, top down conversation, but at least it uses the web as a resource from which it can grow. Then there are orchards, which have many trees and many many bees, from which grow huge amounts of apples. Those apples can be sent out the be sold at markets, where someone who came to buy cucumbers might see them and take one home, or be used to make cider, pies, or a whole host of other products. This is like a blog as a node in a conversation – they link out, comment, participate widely, pull and push content around, etc. The more blogs that participate, the more content spreads, the more each blog will grow audience and flourish – just like apple trees in the orchard. Here are my slides:   Bloggingandapples View SlideShare presentation or Upload your own. (tags: apples...

a few places left for headshift blogging event

By on Sep 23, 2008 in blogging, blogging techniques, conferences/events, headshift, journalism, online community, social software | 2 comments

There are just a few spaces left for a special seminar about blogging which Headshift is co-hosting in cooperation with Six Apart, makers of the blogging tool Movable Type.  The event, taking place this Thursday (25 Sept. 2008) in London, is aimed at helping senior editors, social media stakeholders, online community managers and those leading corporate blogging efforts to learn more about emerging tools and techniques for building participatory communities around their properties. The event will provide participants with a strategic overview of blogging and a demonstration of creative techniques developed during my former role as the Head of Blogging at the BBC, and since evolved further by the social media team here at Headshift. More specifically, guests at the event will learn: what differentiates blogging from traditional web publishing simple techniques for weaving social media into your existing processes, and generating content for your blog along the way how to position your blog(s) as the centre of your distributed web presence how to reach out and engage with existing third party audiences using your blog Khalid Arif and Maarten Schenk from Six Apart will demonstrate the new functionality found in the latest release of Movable Type (4.2), and integration specialists from Headshift will discuss the benefits of combining blogging, page publishing and social networking in the new version of MT and showcase several interesting MT-based implementations. We have room for just a few more participants so if you are interested in attending, and are able to make it to Headshift’s Tower Bridge based headquarters on Thursday afternoon, you can request an invitation by emailing info@headshift.com with your details. Oh, and did I mention, we’re laying on free wine, beer and other...

butter. glue. spreading the link love

By on Sep 11, 2008 in Uncategorized |

Butter. Glue. Spreading the Link Love From: Cybersoc, 2 minutes ago Butter. Glue. Spreading the Link Love View SlideShare presentation or Upload your own. (tags: ibc2008 conference) A slide show about social media for broadcasters – IBC2008 SlideShare...

international broacasting conference (ibc2008)

By on Sep 10, 2008 in BBC, blogging techniques, conferences/events, headshift, journalism, social software |

The panel on Social Media and Broadcasting that I helped organise for the International Broadcasting Conference (IBC) in Amsterdam takes place from 11.30 – 13:00 on Friday in Room L. Joining me on the panel will be BBC Radio 4’s Chris Vallance (iPM)  and Yahoo Europe’s VP of Search & Social Media, Jeff Revoy. The panel will be moderated by Andy Davy, Controller of Portfolio Management, FM&T at the BBC. We’re going to be dipping in and out of a Yahoo Pipe I created to track feedback to the session, live. The pipe looks at twitter, flickr, technorati, google blog search and other sources for links to the session profile page on the IBC site, tags such as IBC and IBC2008, the names of people on the panel, etc. Have a...

live blogging a motorbike journey from england to russia

By on Sep 5, 2008 in BBC, blogging, blogging techniques, citizen journalism, journalism, mobile |

My friend and former work colleague, Matthew Cashmore, who is soon to leave BBC Backstage for his dream job at Lonely Planet in Melbourne, has teamed up with a couple of his mates on a Journey to Russia to raise funds for charity. They’re documenting their journey with blog posts, maps mashups, a live daily video stream and podcasts. Here’s what it’s all about: "Journey To Russia is explained simply; 3 Blokes, 3 Bikes, 3 Weeks. The journey starts in September 2008, when Matt, Stace and Patrick leave London for the far flung cities of St Petersburg and Moscow. The journey will cover several thousand miles in a very short period, crossing the familiar western Europe and venturing into eastern Europe before entering the former USSR. The chaps will visit: Holland, Germany, Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Russia, Ukraine, Slovakia, Hungary, Austria, Luxembourg, and France… Motivation – Matt, Stace and Patrick wanted to do something to raise the profile of a charity very close to their hearts, Everyman. Everyman is dedicated to funding research to cross out prostate and testicular...