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on today and world update this morning

By on Oct 23, 2008 in BBC, blogging, blogging techniques, headshift, social software |

I spent most of the morning on BBC radio. It all started yesterday, when I saw a tweet by Rory Cellan-Jones, alerting me to a blog post he was writing in response to a Wired article proclaiming blogging is dead. I wrote a post about the cuffufle in a tea cup myself over on the Headshift blog before seeing Rory’s follow-up tweets, asking if anyone had a view which I did. Next thing I knew, I was being asked to go on Radio 4’s Today programme with Rory and technology journalist Kate Bevan. We were interviewed by John Humphries who famously refuses to use the computer in the studio at Television Centre… here’s the clip (or Download today_20081023-1023a.mp3 ) It also made the BBC homepage. But that was only the start. Whilst waiting to go on Today, I got a call from the BBC World Service, who also wanted to do an interview about the death of blogging so, as soon as I was done on Today, I headed over to Bush House to be interviewed by Dan Damon on World Update. Apparently it’s broadcast on over 200 FM stations across the USA, as well as key audiences in East Africa and the Middle East – which is a shame because my performance was, at least in my own mind, negatively impacted upon by tiredness, having consumed too much caffeine and a little bit of boredom. The interview ended up being interviewed across three slots in the programme so I’m afraid you’ll have to listen to the financial reports and other bits if you want to listen to it all. I’ve *acquired* two of those bits [Download Robin1.mp3 / Download Robin2.mp3...

st. albans blogger meet-up

By on Oct 17, 2008 in blogging, conferences/events | 2 comments

More than anything else, the thing I love about blogging is that it brings people together. Not just online, but offline too. Which, I guess, is why I find myself organising yet another blogger meet-up, this time in St. Albans where I live. Some of you will know that I have several blogs, one of which documents "living, eating and drinking" in St. Albans. The blog has taken off recently, with traffic now far exceeding traffic here on cybersoc.com. In implementing it, I’ve stolen some of the ideas from the BBC Manchester Blog – namely, to aggregate and link out to other local bloggers and content sources as a way of positioning the blog at the centre of the local blogging community – and have added a few new tricks, like plotting reviews on a google map. I’m also organising a meet-up for St. Albans based bloggers in the hopes that, by going out and having a few beers, we’ll start to think of ourselves as a community of bloggers who can each give and receive links, content and assistance to each other. Oh, and go for yet more beers on other ocassions. So if you’re a St. Albans (or thereabout) based blogger and want to meet other local bloggers, put the 28th of October in your diary and watch this post for a confirmation of the location. UPDATE: THE VENUE HAS BEEN CONFIRMED – WE’LL BE MEETING AT THE PORTLAND ARMS FROM ABOUT 7PM....

bbc blog costs £17 billion…

By on Oct 16, 2008 in BBC, blogging, blogging techniques, journalism, newspapers |

bbc blog costs £17 billion…Originally uploaded by robinhamman Last year, Iain Dale brought us the news that government blogs were costing tax payers many thousands of pounds a month to run. David Milliband’s blog, for example, apparently costs over £40,000 a year and the Welfare Reform and Child Poverty blog was revealed, in response to a parliamentary question, to cost nearly £1500 per month to run – equivalent to around £2 per visitor. For a second or two, when I read the headline "BBC Blog That Cost our Banks £17 Billion" in Metro last week, I thought a journalist had got the wrong end of the stick – afterall, I used to run the BBC’s blogs and they didn’t cost anything like £17 billion… Thankfully, that’s not what the article was getting at. Instead, it was blaming BBC Journalist Robert Peston, who blogged about the near collapse of a major British bank and a government brokered merger in the hours before the markets opened, leading – some say – to even greater losses in the financial markets. The Independent recently wrote: "In recent weeks, as capitalism itself has seemed in peril,, the BBC business editor has hardly been off duty, whether reporting for Radio 4’s Today programme, for rolling news and the bulletins, or posting on Peston’s Picks, his influential blog. On 17 September, at exactly 9am, a new entry on that blog opened with the simple but remarkable sentence: "Lloyds is in advanced merger talks with HBOS to create a giant UK super retail bank, I have learned." Within seconds of posting the story from the PC in his office at home in Muswell Hill, north London, Peston, 48, had walked to the spare room and, via a specially-installed ISDN line, was broadcasting his scoop live on the BBC News channel. In the words of this newspaper, Peston’s influence meant that he was "one of the few men with the power to dam the floodwaters heading HBOS’s way". This was the same reporter who had already won the Royal Television Society’s "Scoop of the Year" award for his coverage of the collapse of the Northern Rock building society. Peston is perhaps the first senior journalist to publish a major, breaking story on their blog as the first available outlet. My guess is we’re going to see a lot more unmediated, unedited journalism like this in the future although there are, it should be said, major risks involved. It’s not just Andrew Gilligan who can make a...

speaking at european broadcasting union

By on Oct 6, 2008 in blogging techniques, citizen journalism, conferences/events, journalism, newspapers, social software |

I’m going to be speaking at the European Broadcasting Union’s International Broadcasting Conference in Geneva on Tuesday. It was a bit of a last minute booking, and will involve a 4am taxi journey to Luton Airport, but it will be a real pleasure having the opportunity to discuss how social media is changing the media landscape with the leadership of many of Europe’s Public Service Broadcasting corporations. Photos, tweets, etc to follow…