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aib awards video: robin hamman interviewed by jonathan marks

By on Nov 24, 2008 in blogging, blogging techniques, citizen journalism, conferences/events, headshift, journalism, newspapers, social software |

I've been really busy speaking at different events the past few weeks. At the end of October, I spent an afternoon at the News of the World Editors Conference. I'm afraid I can't tell you much more about that but it was a lot more fun "being grilled by Fleet Street's finest attack dogs", as Editor Colin Myler put it in his invitation, than one might initially suspect from an event with a billing like that. They sell 3+ million copies of their Sunday paper in a country of around 60 million people but have, thus far, only made baby steps online. On the 9th I was at blogboat.be in Ghent, Belgium, to moderate the evening panel debate between Dan Gillmor, newspaper editor and author Henk Blanken and Han Soete from Indymedia. The panel was proceeded by an afternoon discussion about citizen media, blogging and journalism which took place, as the name might imply, on a boat. Then, on the 12th, I was one of two guests invited to take part "in conversation" on the stage at the Association for International Broadcasting Awards dinner at St. Lukes LSO in London. I was interviewed by Jonathan Marks – video below: I also did the first of four three hour teaching sessions, each comprising of a lecture followed by two workshops, at the Department of Journalism at City University, London, where I'm teaching on the MA International Journalism programme. I'm back there again on the 2nd of December. In Mid-December, I'll be in Dubai for the New Media Event which I'm particularly looking forward to as it, potentially, will be an entirely new audience for me and I'm hoping to learn as much, if not more, than I dish out...

crowdsourcing a university journalism lecture

By on Nov 18, 2008 in academic studies, blogging, blogging techniques, citizen journalism, headshift, journalism, social software | 1 comment

Today was my first day teaching on the MA International Journalism programme at City University London. In preparation, I’ve been asking my twitter and facebook followers to help me come up with an outline for the lecture and received an almost overwhelming amount of feedback, much of it very useful indeed. I asked, in various ways, what I should show journalism students – some of them already accomplished journalists in their own right – from the worlds of blogging and social media. My session, the first of four I’ll be teaching between now and the end of the Spring term, was tentatively billed as an introduction to "social media journalism" or, depending on who you might have asked, "social networking for journalists". Anyway, here’s the helpful advice that my twitter followers shared (I’ve not posted the facebook responses, of which there were at least a dozen, because they are essential private where as all of these come up in a public tweet search). Thanks to all those who helped!             egrommet: @Cybersoc yay! say hello from sunny Cardiff. we’re using all the things you suggested yesterday plus Mento to allow team chat on bookmark               about 7 hours ago ·         Reply     · View Tweet           · Show ConversationHide Conversation                                  noodlepie: @Cybersoc I guess you chose to start with Twitter :) Go teacher !               about 7 hours ago ·         Reply     · View Tweet                           hazel: @Cybersoc, I’m sure they will learn a lot from you :-)               about 7 hours ago ·         Reply     · View Tweet                           eamonncarey: @Cybersoc fun and games. there’s nothing like standing in front of a class and hoping that you can keep them interested and entertained!               about 8 hours ago ·         Reply     · View Tweet                           paulmartinsmith: @Cybersoc I’d start with the why – ‘why is social enterprise technology and its use important’ – sets context for what follows, grip em ;)               about 18 hours ago ·         Reply     · View Tweet                           kittenhotep: @cybersoc even s’thing as simple as comments on a news article – facts checked by audience/corrected by journalist = relationship developed.               about 19 hours ago ·         Reply     · View Tweet           · Show ConversationHide Conversation                                  kittenhotep: @cybersoc even s’thing as simple as comments on a news article – facts checked by audience/corrected by journalist = relationshop developed               about 19 hours ago ·         Reply     · View Tweet           · Show ConversationHide Conversation                                  arvind: @Cybersoc I would start with delicious, easy for people to understand bookmarks (old school), and gets them into tags (new school)…               about 19 hours ago ·         Reply     · View Tweet                           lorrvid: @Cybersoc show them ping.fm it links the whole lot lol               about 19 hours ago ·         Reply     · View Tweet                           hrheingold: @Cybersoc RSS, pipes, map mashups (Chicagocrime), widgets (Sproutbuilder is nice way to intro), delicious               about 19 hours ago ·         Reply     · View Tweet                           kittenhotep: @cybersoc would also point out examples of citizen journalism, but perhaps not in 1st lecture. Also, how news spreads in SM/long tail, etc.               about 19 hours ago ·         Reply     · View Tweet           · Show ConversationHide Conversation                                  kittenhotep: @cybersoc all of the above, and maybe throw in something about how new/social media is shaping journalism (Christian Science Monitor, etc).               about 19 hours ago ·         Reply     · View Tweet           · Show ConversationHide Conversation                                  jeton: @Cybersoc I suggest you just skip Facebook . ;)               about 19 hours ago ·         Reply     · View Tweet         monkeywatcher: @Cybersoc learn them what RSS is and how to use it (monitoring, alerts, aggregators,…).That’s something they don’t teach us at our univ        ...

blogboat – citizen journalism: this weekend in ghent

By on Nov 6, 2008 in blogging, blogging techniques, citizen journalism, conferences/events, headshift, journalism, newspapers, wemedia | 1 comment

On Sunday, I’m heading to Ghent to take part in Blog Boat 1.0 – Citizen Journalism. As the name suggests, it’s an event about blogging and journalism which will take place on a boat but, rest assured, the organisers tell me it’s not an us vs them sort of thing, nor will the boat actually move. During the afternoon, an invitation only "meeting of the minds" will bring together journalists, academics and bloggers to discuss the future of citizen journalism and, in the evening, I’ll be moderating a free (registration required) interactive debate with Dan Gillmor and other participants from the day. Here’s how the organisers are framing the debate: "Over the last couple of years traditional media has tried to formulate an answer to this development in finding a balance between print – and online information, in keeping track with the newest technological trends to present their information and in figuring out how to integrate citizen journalism within their (online) information channels.  What are workable/feasible models for the future?  In what way technological developments will influence the way we deal with news and information. Will they empower us more, will new constraints appear and will the old once be sorted in time? Is there a possible role for guides/filters and who would these filters be (newspapers, well known bloggers … ? And in line with the later, is there a possible role for guides/curators guiding non-expert users through the information in an open way build on trust and reputation? What are the possible ways forward for mainstream media in working with citizen journalists?" Having met Dan and several of the other participants previously, I’m looking forward to a thoughtful, challenging and wide ranging debate. Although over 100 people have already signed up, registration is still open so if you want to attend, make sure you get your name on the list. See you aboard!              ...