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you know you’ve become a “business traveller” when…

By on Feb 27, 2013 in Uncategorized |

The other morning, whilst waiting on a plane for over an hour when my departure was delayed, I realised that at some point I'd become a "business traveller". Here's a few of the signs I came up with in a series of early morning tweets: 1. You've added +44 and knocked a zero off all the UK numbers in your mobile contacts 2. You know exactly where the taxi should set you down for fast access to T5 security (far end. close end opens at 6am) 3. You know your Avios balance and how many tier points you need by yoir renewal date 4. You committed your passport number to memory and carry pre-completed Landing Cards 5. You note a pre-5am spike in your tweets 6. You hit level 8 of the jetsetter badge on FourSquare and are surprised that equates to only 36 different airports 7. You know how to get around IP address enforced limits on free airport wifi 8. The person at immigration says see you next week 9. Duty free becomes your local wine retailer 10. You call destinations by their three letter airport code 11. You have suitcases specially for for one night, three nights and holidays 12. You foursquare friend request people who are checked in to the same airport lounge 13. You speak warmly of the shopping at CPH and ICN because you saw nothing else during your visits 14. You have a packing "strategy" 15. You keep spare mac dongles in each bag 16. You've reread this months HighLife 4 times 17. You avoid conversation with neighbouring passengers at all costs 18. You decant your shampoo into hotel shampoo bottles of no more than 100ml 19. You avoid buying shoes with metal in them 20. Most of your text messages are warnings from your mobile networking warning you of roaming charges 21. You avoid following people holding folders full of papers when in the immigration queue 22. You avoid families with children at security checkpoints, particularly if they have a pushchair 23. You mark the page stamped by immigration on the way in so as to speed your exit on the way out 24. All your devices are showing the time in different time zones 25. You say thank you in the wrong language when leaving a restaurant down the street from your own home   Feel free to add you own…...

slides: a potted history of online community management 1985 to 2013

By on Feb 26, 2013 in BBC, blogging, citizen journalism, conferences/events, edelman, headshift, journalism, online community, social software |

A couple weeks ago, I had the pleasure of giving a rather personal presentation at the Vircomm Conference – a potted history of online community management, from 1985 to present, as lived from my own perspective. Some, but not all, of the stories I ended up telling can be found in the notes – although you miss out on the one about Beatrice the World Service “pool typist” and the Gay or Not themed chat we did post-watershed for BBC3’s That Gay Show. Really.     Community Management 1985 to 2013 from Robin...

a potted history of online community management

By on Feb 4, 2013 in BBC, blogging, blogging techniques, citizen journalism, conferences/events, edelman, headshift, journalism, online community, social software |

The past few days, I've been working on a presentation for the Vircomm Summit, a gathering of the online community management industry, which will take place in London this Thursday. Rather than showing a whole bunch of industry folk stuff they already know – strategies, models and case studies – I've decided to deliver what can best be described as a Potted History of Online Community Management. In the presentation, I'll cover the: pre-internet days of dial-up bulletin board systems (BBSs) wild frontier of usenet and IRC walled gardens of the mid-90's early days – and challenges – for audience interactivity at the BBC  launch of the BBC's web chat service investing in community management training and roll out at the BBC the first (??) multi-domain community management platform we developed at G-Wizz.net what "twitter" looked like in 2001 BBCi chat studio at Bush House and the professionalisation of online community management at the Corporation expansion by the BBC into building engagement on third party social networkign and content sharing services the state of the industry today – grown up strategies, approaches, platforms and measurement frameworks my thoughts on the source(s) of competition to the online community industry in the future Although my narrative and most of the screenshots are in place, I've yet to tidy up the visual presentation – stay tuned, I'll post the slides as soon as I can after presenting them at Vircomm on...