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greg dyke: i never understood all that new media crap…

By on Apr 12, 2007 in BBC, digital television, journalism |

BBC relic Originally uploaded by dan taylor. Whilst cleaning out my rucksack this morning I came across this quote, neatly clipped from the Business and Media section of the Observer (01 April 2007 pg. 9): Those who suspected that former BBC D-G [Director General] Greg Dyke, was puzzled by the internet, TV on demand, PVRs and so forth should know he confirmed as much soon after his departure. The signed copy of his biography that he handed to the BBC’s head of new media and Technology, Ashley Highfield, contained the inscription: ‘I never understood all that new media crap anyway’. Thankfully for me and the many others who work in new media at the BBC, Dyke seems to have been talking about something different when making his famous rallying call, “Cut the Crap, Make it...

new feed to read: doctorvee

By on Mar 13, 2007 in BBC, blogging, blogging techniques, citizen journalism, digital television, journalism, newspapers, social software | 1 comment

For months I’ve been proactively trying to cut down on the number of RSS feeds I’m subscribed to because, these days, I rarely get a chance to check more than a dozen of them each day anyway. There’s something about hitting the 200 unread posts per blog limit on bloglines that fills me with dread – and leads to bizarre incidents where I have to close my eyes and click on feeds randomly because I just can’t face missing all that content knowingly. I did describe those as “bizarre incidents”. My point in telling you this is not so that you immediately run a mile but, instead, so that you realise that I must really really really be impressed with a blog these days to subscribe to it. Well, today someone sent me a link to a cutting post on DoctorVee, a blog I hadn’t come across before: “As usual for a Sunday, I woke up this morning listening to Julian Worricker’s programme on Radio Five Live. Today, in place of the Five Live Report, was a one-off programme about “Blogging in the UK”. “Oh, that’ll be interesting,” I thought, so I stayed in bed and waited for it to come on. I was to discover that the programme wasn’t about blogging at all. Blogging in the UK was originally part of ‘Your Five Live’, which I mentioned in my post about user generated content. Specifically, it was a feature of Five Live’s Breakfast programme. The idea was to take a day during ‘Your Five Live’ week — the 22nd of January — and encourage as many first time bloggers to write about their day. The results are predictably awful, reinforcing the stereotypes about how bloggers are just people who write about what they had for breakfast. And it shows just how little whoever came up with the idea actually knows about what blogging is about. For a start, the entries were posted by users in the comments of the Breakfast programme’s blog. This isn’t blogging. This is just a list of people’s mundane day to day activities.” DoctorVee reaches parts that other blogs don’t touch with posts like User generated content doesn’t belong on the mainstream media , Blogging takes no time at all , Broadcasters should now be biased if they want to be and Warning: This is a navel-gazing post about blogging, and they are the worst. I realise that some of these posts are near enough a year old now which means that I’m rather late to the party. To make up for it, I not only left a comment and wrote this nice post, I’ve added DoctorVee, written by a Duncan Steven in Fife, to my feed subscriptions and added him to my delicious network too. I see some of my workmates have already done the...

google imagines building communities of TV viewers

By on Jun 17, 2006 in BBC, digital television, social software |

Earlier this week, the news was that ebay was planning to start using keyword ads. Now Google has tested a system that can figure out what TV program you’re watching on screen and present you with real-time viewer forums and chat rooms – or more likely targetted ads – based on your viewing habits BBC News Online has the details: “A system that lets your computer “listen” to your television to create targeted web adverts has been designed and tested by researchers at Google. The “mass personalization” system can identify a programme from as little as five seconds of sound. It then presents related information or adverts in the web browser. Google researchers believe it could also be used to monitor audience size or create social networks around viewers watching the same show. “The system could keep up with users while they channel surf, presenting them with a real-time forum about a live political debate one minute and an ad-hoc chat room for a sporting event in the next,” wrote Google researchers Michele Covell and Shumeet Baluja on the Google research blog.” If your interested in this type of thing, check out Tom Coate’s blog PlaticBag.org for more online community building around TV and radio...

george bush falls victim to the EPG

By on May 28, 2006 in citizen journalism, digital television |

george bush falls victim to the epg Originally uploaded by robinh1973. The electronic program guide (epg) decides that a George Bush speech broadcast on Voice of America TV (Hotbird Satellite 370) is called “dummyEventName”. And who said there was no such thing as machine intelligence?! By the way, I got my hotbird box and dish from SatEuropa.co.uk. I’m not particularly into watching television but channel surfing from Voice of America to Al Jazeera to Kurdistan TV to Italian Porn (which sets new standards for interactivity, by the way) to the Maharashi Network is a truly fascinating experience. I also, for reasons I have yet to understand myself, enjoy Russia Today on...

television on your 3G mobile

By on Nov 20, 2005 in digital television, mobile | 2 comments

Vodafone and Sky have teamed up to bring you Sky television on your mobile. Will people really sit and watch television on such a tiny screen? Well, Apple has done really well with it’s newest video enabled iPod so it would seem that, yes, despite the screen size some people just can’t get enough television. At the end of June I moved to a 3G mobile service myself so decided to try downloading and watching a video on my phone. The process of finding content was easy enough considering my mobile provider now "helpfully provides me with" links everytime they send a message to inform me I have new voice mail. The download, a couple of mb of data, took perhaps a minute and a half. When I opened the file my phone, a Symbian based Nokia 6630 smartphone running RealPlayer, crashed and told me it didn’t have enough memory. After closing some programmes I was able to watch a 3 minute long news clip on my phone. Other than the pleasure of trying something new, I wouldn’t say I found the experience particularly useful. It might get lots of use when a major incident occurs and people urgently want to know what’s going on, like on the 07 July when bombs hit London, or when there is a big sporting even like England’s recent success on the cricket pitch, but nightly episodes of Lost, Desperate Housewives, or Coronation Street? Yeh, ok, they’re gonna make a lot of money off of...

BBC radio player dashboard widget

By on Jun 27, 2005 in BBC, digital television | 1 comment

I’ve been looking for this since installing Mac OSX Tiger: a dashboard widget for the BBC radio player. (created by Andy Allcorn)