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slides: a potted history of online community management 1985 to 2013

By on Feb 26, 2013 in BBC, blogging, citizen journalism, conferences/events, edelman, headshift, journalism, online community, social software |

A couple weeks ago, I had the pleasure of giving a rather personal presentation at the Vircomm Conference – a potted history of online community management, from 1985 to present, as lived from my own perspective. Some, but not all, of the stories I ended up telling can be found in the notes – although you miss out on the one about Beatrice the World Service “pool typist” and the Gay or Not themed chat we did post-watershed for BBC3’s That Gay Show. Really.     Community Management 1985 to 2013 from Robin...

a potted history of online community management

By on Feb 4, 2013 in BBC, blogging, blogging techniques, citizen journalism, conferences/events, edelman, headshift, journalism, online community, social software |

The past few days, I've been working on a presentation for the Vircomm Summit, a gathering of the online community management industry, which will take place in London this Thursday. Rather than showing a whole bunch of industry folk stuff they already know – strategies, models and case studies – I've decided to deliver what can best be described as a Potted History of Online Community Management. In the presentation, I'll cover the: pre-internet days of dial-up bulletin board systems (BBSs) wild frontier of usenet and IRC walled gardens of the mid-90's early days – and challenges – for audience interactivity at the BBC  launch of the BBC's web chat service investing in community management training and roll out at the BBC the first (??) multi-domain community management platform we developed at G-Wizz.net what "twitter" looked like in 2001 BBCi chat studio at Bush House and the professionalisation of online community management at the Corporation expansion by the BBC into building engagement on third party social networkign and content sharing services the state of the industry today – grown up strategies, approaches, platforms and measurement frameworks my thoughts on the source(s) of competition to the online community industry in the future Although my narrative and most of the screenshots are in place, I've yet to tidy up the visual presentation – stay tuned, I'll post the slides as soon as I can after presenting them at Vircomm on...

joining edelman

By on Jun 4, 2010 in edelman, headshift | 20 comments

In a few days, I'll be embarking on the next stage of my career by joining Edelman as Director of Digital in their London office. I can't think of a more exciting time to be joining Edelman – Advertising Age’s top-ranked PR firm of the decade, Adweek’s “2009 PR Agency of the Year,” and Holmes Report’s “Agency of the Decade” and “2009 Best Large Agency to Work For”. It's been a long courtship. I first met David Brain, President and CEO (EMEA), at an event about three years ago, whilst he was working on his book Crowdsurfing. I soon became, and continue to be, an avid reader of his blog SixtySecondView. Not long after, I bumped into Marshall Manson , who immediately impressed me with his years of strategic and practical experience at the collision point between PR and social media, following his appointment as Director of Digital Strategy. Since then, the Edelman Digital team in London has grown significantly, particularly following Edelman's acquisition of Spook Media, an already successful digital design and development agency headed up by Marcus Dyer. Then, early this year, Richard Sambrook, the BBC's former Director of Global Media and a friend, announced he was joining Edelman. Richard was, back when we were both at the BBC, a keen and invaluable supporter of the work I was doing to push boundaries in the way BBC journalists, editors and producers connect with audiences using social media. Soon after, Marcus and Marshall invited me around to meet some members of the team, see some of the work they're doing, and to make an introduction to Robert Phillips, Edelman's UK CEO and co-author of Citizen Renaissance. In addition to the stuff that David and Robert have been doing, if you're not familiar with the thought leadership coming out of Edelman Digital, or the Edelman Insights, Case Studies, or the Global Peace Index and the Edelman Trust Barometer, do take a look – Edelman's websites are a treasure trove of great content. There's also an industry leading, and growing, Edelman Digital team in the US, some members of which you're bound to have read, seen or followed including Scott Wilder,  Steve Rubel and David Armano. I'm obviously excited about joining Edelman's industry leading team, but I'm also conscious that I'm leaving behind some great people, projects and clients at Headshift, where I've been the Social Media Practice Lead for the last two years. It's been fun, but it's time to take on some new challenges, which my new role at Edelman will no doubt supply in abundance. My first day at Edelman will be the 7th of June. Seat belts...

two new posts this week (links and excerpts)

By on Apr 30, 2010 in headshift, social software |

There are two new posts, both lengthy, by me this week on the Headshift Blog – Purposely shaping interaction in social spaces Excerpt: "…I've long been fascinated with Celebration, the town created by Disney in Florida, and other examples of modern, purpose built towns and suburbs. At Celebration, which I've both read about and visited, planners set out to correct many of the problems they'd observed in modern American suburbs – primarily the privatisation of community, where families were disconnected from their neighbours by large gardens, a car centric lifestyle, shopping in distant shopping malls and other features typical of modern life. The first thing you notice, when visiting Celebration, is that amenities such as shops, the school and parkland are all located at the centre of the town. Homes were, at least in the initial phases of the development, located close to the centre, with pavements made deliberately wide and roads narrow to encourage residents to walk into town. Unlike typical American suburbs with large gardens, both front and back, separating the homes of residents, gardens in Celebration were kept small, with houses located close to the front of the plots they were built on. Every house also has a covered front porch to encourage people to spend time outside, close to where neighbours might be passing by, making the neighbourhood both feel safer and encouraging the sort of daily familiarity that often leads to the sort of random discussions that often lead, in time, to new friendships. When we build social propositions online, we try to think about many of the same things. What are the features and spaces that all users will want or need to use? How can we build familarity between users who may or may not have previous contact with each other? How do we support positive behaviours that support use cases we want to encourage?…" And, a second post, Making boundaries deliberately porous with social tools Excerpt: "Sometimes, what goes on behind the firewall needs to – for legal, competitive, regulatory or confidentiality reasons – stay there, but it often does make sense to bring the outside in, and expose some processes, people and ideas where there is a business case to doing so. Social media – we usually call it social tools here at Headshift – can be the bridge that enables this to happen. The approach reminds me, to some extent, of the architectural ideas championed by American Prairie School, of which Frank Lloyd Wright's work provides the most well known examples. In many of the properties he designed, Wright used locally quarried stone to build walls and other structures that are visible both inside and outside the home, seamlessly connecting the two and blending into the natural surroundings. Doors can often be opened to balconies to extend living space, which up until this time had usually been internal, outside. At Fallingwater, probably his most famous work, he built a home on top of a waterfall, filling the building with the sight and sounds of water crashing down beneath – and through – the structure. The work we're doing to transform businesses into more socially calibrated entities often blurs the boundaries, as in Wright's work, between the outside and...

Slides: Social Business Design in Action from #sbs2010 Sydney

By on Mar 25, 2010 in conferences/events, headshift, online community, social software | 2 comments

I'm in Sydney for the Social Business Summit organised by Headshift Australasia. Following an insightful introduction to Social Business by Jeff Dachis, I brought things back to earth with a set of case studies demonstrating some of the opportunities we see for businesses that embrace social business. Here are my slides: Social Business in Action: Social Business Summit Sydney View more presentations from Robin Hamman. For those of you who prefer me with my journalism hat on, I gave a totally different presentation at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) yesterday morning. Earlier in the week I also stopped by the Interactive Games and Entertainment Association (iGEA) and popped over to Canberra to help run a "Online Engagement Masterclass" for the public sector. Tomorrow I'm stopping by the Sydney office of a UK based Headshift client and after that I intend to sleep – it's been an exciting, but totally exhausting...

australia social business and online engagement events: more details

By on Feb 19, 2010 in conferences/events, headshift, journalism, online community, social software |

As I mentioned in a previous post, I'm heading to Australia in March to participate in a number of events organised by my colleagues at Headshift Australasia. It would be great to meet some of you there so if you fancy attending any of the events drop me a line and I'll see what I can do. 22 March: Masterclass on Online Engagement in the Public Sector (Canberra) 23 March: Briefing to the Interactive Games and Entertainment Association of Australia, Sydney 24 March: Presentation and Workshop on the use of Social Media by Broadcasters at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), Sydney. 25 March: Social Business Summit Australia It's going to be a busy, but interesting, week. Click the links, or drop me an email, to find out more. [Sydney Opera House photo by Leithcote used under a Creative Commons License allowing Commercial Use with Attribution. See the original as well as Leigthcote's other great photos on...